Tag Archives: Magellan’s Navigator

Magellan’s Fleet is about to Sail (Five Hundred Years Ago.)

Magellan_1810_engravingJune, 1519. Final preparations are underway for the sailing of Magellan’s fleet to find a route to the Molucca Islands, the sole source of cloves in the world. Over a year earlier, on March 22, 1518, the Portuguese Magellan signed an agreement with young King Charles of Spain to pioneer the route. Five ships purchased in Cádiz were towed up river to Seville, and there fully refurbished. Francisco Albo, first mate of the flagship Trinidad, works by Magellan’s side on the myriad of details necessary for a successful expedition.

Things haven’t gone smoothly. Officials of the Casa de Contratación de las Indies, which oversees Magellan’s expedition, spend as much time on their own illicit dealings as readying and provisioning the fleet. Nonetheless, Magellan is only months away from sailing. Manning the fleet is a special concern. Portuguese/Spanish rivalry has led to severe restrictions on the number of Portuguese on the fleet. Cliques within the Casa want it manned by Spaniards, but recruiting Spanish sailors isn’t easy. The plague has produced manpower shortages in Spain, and with the discoveries of gold in the New World, it’s more attractive to sign on to sail there than on some unknown route to a place a sailor has never heard of and under command of a foreigner. As a result, Magellan’s fleet will sail with a dysphoria from across Europe, including men from Norway, England, France, and Greece as well as a host of Italians.

More ominously, jockeying for the fleet’s final command posts is in process. Magellan ends up saddled with several mistrustful Spanish captains with no sea experience. That sets the stage for next year’s mutiny in Patagonia and later dire consequences.

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Magellan’s Navigator’s Sequel is Coming!

I can safely say that the sequel to Magellan’s Navigator will be out before George R.R. Martin’s The Winds of War. Okay. I know that isn’t saying much. Let me rephrase that. I believe the sequel to Magellan’s Navigator will be out this year. Half of it is written and in good shape, while all of it is plotted.

Briefly, the sequel is Master and Commander on a galley in 1523. Albo becomes master and pilot on the Spanish galley Cruz de Barcelona. He battles, as usual, the sea, but also the corsairs of the infamous Barbary pirate Barbarossa. Actually, Barbarossa wasn’t a pirate or from Barbary, but that is part of the story. A blonde countess enlivens Albo’s life while the implacable hatred of his captain for the Moors complicates things.

My attempt to understand early sixteenth century galleys slowed progress on the book. There is no definitive source of exactly what a Spanish galley looked like at this time. There is a replica galley in Barcelona’s Maritime Museum of the flagship galley at the battle of Lepanto in 1571. Unfortunately, this huge ship is not representative of galleys fifty years earlier or even in 1571. There are detailed plans of Venetian galleys. In the end, I assumed Spanish galleys were somewhat larger, more heavily armed, but less agile.

I’m hoping fans will enjoy reading it as much as I am writing it.

My working title is The King’s Galley, but I’m open to suggestions. I thought of Master and Pilot for about five seconds until I realized that was probably too close to Master and Commander.

 

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Magellan’s Navigator’s Sales Hit a Record

January was my best month ever for Magellan’s Navigator. Thank you readers!

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Writing: A Look Back and a Look Forward

2017 was a breakthrough year for me. Sales of Magellan’s Navigator have been steady and it’s garnered many good reviews on Amazon and Goodreads. As a writer, it’s immensely satisfying to see people enjoying my work, like the gentleman from Cebu in the Philippines who recently wrote a review on Amazon.

The sequel to Magellan’s Navigator is outlined and a quarter written. Think Master and Commander on a galley as Albo spars with the Barbary pirates. I just need a title for it.

I wrote enough words for a novel in 2017, yet published nothing. That will change soon when my new science fiction books Mindfield and Mindgames come out. They can be read as space opera, but Mindfield is really about one man’s search for his identity. I hope readers enjoy this book as much as I do. The setting for these books is forty years after my Truth-Teller books. Some of the characters in the latter reprise as secondary characters in the new books.

So I’ll have three books out in 2018. Best wishes to all in the New Year.

 

 

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Magellan’s Navigator Meet & Greet

magellans-navigatorMonday I have an author meet and greet at the Poulsbo Book Stop for Magellan’s Navigator from 1 pm to 5:30 pm. Stop by and let’s chat about sailing, or cloves, or the Mariners!

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Book Signing for Magellan’s Navigator

I’m one of the featured authors at the Pacific Northwest Writers Association’s historical fiction book signing.

 I’ll have copies of my newly released historical novel Magellan’s Navigator.

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There will be nibbles and a raffle.

Other authors and their books are:

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Rebecca J. Novelli                  The Train to Orvieto

Deborah Lincoln                     Agnes Canon’s War

SJ McCormack                        Night Witch

and others

 

I’d love to see you there:

Saturday, February 18th from 1 to 3 PM

at the PNWA Writer’s Cottage in Gilman Village, Issaquah, Washington

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Fact and fiction in Magellan’s Navigator

Magellan’s Navigator sticks closely to the known facts of Magellan’s voyage. The dates are accurate. Every person named, with one exception, did have a part in the first circumnavigation of the world. There was a master gunner named Andrew who was from Bristol and who died of scurvy soon after leaving Guam. However, Andrew’s wife, Ana Estrada is my invention. On the other hand, Fidelia was Ginés’s wife and believing he was lost, she did remarry before he finally returned.

I used Albo’s logbook to fix the time and place of the fleet during its voyage. Antonio Pigafetta’s Report on the First Voyage Around the World gave me an eyewitness report of the people he met and the places he saw. My descriptions of the rajahs Humabon and Almanzor are from Pigafetta’s book. Also borrowed from Pigafetta are the lengthy lists of gifts to the rajahs. I am indebted to the late Tim Joyner for his book Magellan. His meticulously researched book uses Spanish and Portuguese sources, unlike many other books about Magellan. His fleet rosters are by far the most complete I’ve seen.

So what is fiction? I really don’t know because the events as told in Magellan’s Navigator are both plausible and possible. Historical sources contradict one another about the details of some events, like the mutiny. For example, while my explanation of the San Antonio’s capture during the mutiny can’t be proved, it also can’t be disproved. It is known that for some reason one of the mutineer ships floated helplessly to Magellan’s ships, and Albo could very well have been responsible for that happening.

I did have to simplify things by focusing on a limited number of crewmembers. I did that after early drafts thoroughly confused readers when I included all Albo’s shipmates. I apologize to Leone Pancaldo and the others who deserved to be mentioned, but had to be excised from the story for readability.

One issue I’d like to address is Albo’s ethnicity. Wikipedia lists Albo as being from Rodas, Spain. This is questionable. The Spanish roster simply lists Albo as being from Rodas with a birthplace of Axio. This is consistent with my having Albo being born in Thessaloniki on the Axios River in Greece, and his being most recently from Rhodes (Rodas.)  Roses is evidently an alternative spelling of Rodas. There is a small port of Roses in Catalonia, but I see no associated place name of Axios, which argues against Albo from being there. Andre Rossfelder’s In Pursuit of Longitude  makes the argument that Albo was from Roses, but concedes  he does not know whether Albo was Greek or Spanish. Numerous Portuguese and Spanish historians over the centuries have called Albo a Greek, so I went with the preponderance of opinion. In addition, S.E. Morison in his The European Discovery of America, the Southern Voyages cites a source that claims a survivor of the circumnavigation sailed with Piri Reis, the Ottoman admiral. We know what happened to most of the survivors afterward, except for Albo, who disappears from history. His being from Greece is consistent to his returning to the eastern Mediterranean and working with Piri Reis.

I hope you enjoy Magellan’s Navigator. It is available in print and paperback on Amazon. Just click the photo above.

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