Magellan Prepares to Winter in Patagonia – A Mutiny Brews

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March 31, 1520 – Magellan’s Fleet Finds Refuge in Patagonia

Winter is approaching and the air is already colder. The last of the fresh food from Rio was gone weeks ago. Forays ashore to kill seals and penguins for food yielded some meat, but stores of hard tack, beans, wine, and other staples are shrinking…and these must last the winter.

Each night since the Plate River, Magellan’s hoped he’ll discover the strait to the Indies the next day, but each morning has brought only the same barren, rocky coastline. This has gone on for over seven weeks and the men, and especially the Spanish captains doubt Magellan.

The fleet’s been battered by a series of storm since leaving the River Plate. Miraculously, they’ve lost no ships or men, despite storms sweeping away the ships’ fore and aft castles, and, at one time, leaving a foraging party abandoned on a beach for nearly a week. Now the ships are badly in need of repair and the men of rest. Magellan has been seeking a suitable place in which to spend the winter. Finally, on this date, he enters a sheltered harbor. It appears to have game, fish, and shellfish that they might gather and catch as well as fresh water. While there aren’t any native villages, it otherwise appears to be a good place to spend the winter. Magellan names it Port Julian.

Magellan holds a meeting of the officers, announcing that they will winter here. He also announces reduced rations, despite the cold weather increasing the men’s appetites. The officers and men urge Magellan to return to Spain, and if not Spain, Rio. Magellan refuses, knowing that if either happens his armada will never sail again for the Spice Islands.

The next day is Easter Sunday and Magellan announces there will be religious observances ashore, followed by a dinner for the fleet’s officers aboard his flagship, the Trinidad. Magellan apparently is oblivious that the Spanish captains’ mutinous sentiment

Easter Sunday – At least two of the Spanish captains do not attend the onshore Easter observances. These are men who take religion very seriously, and their absence must create a sense of unease among Magellan and his clique. That night none of the officers shows at Magellan’s dinner aboard his flagship other than his cousin, who is captain of the San Antonio. Many of the fleet’s officers are professional mariners and have stayed aloof of the conflict between Magellan and the Spanish captains. Even these officers don’t show for dinner. Clearly it is general knowledge that something is about to happen, but what?

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